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ALS Therapy Development Institute

Dr. Lukashev joined the ALS Therapy Development Institute in 2013 with over 20 years of postgraduate research experience and 14 years of biotechnology industry experience. He has supported and led therapeutic discovery and development programs across all stages of drug development in therapeutic areas of neurology, oncology, immunology and fibrosis. His leadership of the research effort supporting clinical development of Tecfidera, an oral small molecule therapeutic recently approved by the FDA for treatment of multiple sclerosis was recognized by an Outstanding Scientific Achievement Award from Biogen Idec, Inc. Dr. Lukashev received a Ph.D. from the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, and postdoctoral training at Johns Hopkins and University of California, San Francisco.

Keywords: [“Development”, “therapeutic”, “supported”]
Source: https://www.als.net/als-research/

ALS Center of Excellence

The Pranger ALS Clinic at the ALS Center of Excellence is committed to providing compassionate care to patients with ALS. Certified by the ALS Association for more than two decades, we offer treatments that maximize quality of life and functional independence and manage symptoms. We know that ALS affects the whole family unit and offer compassion and support not only to our patients, but also their family and friends. Treating ALS requires a large, dedicated multidisciplinary team, such as the exceptional group we have assembled at the University of Michigan. The University of Michigan ALS Center is dedicated to the diagnosis, treatment and compassionate care of ALS. Our Research. The University of Michigan is a world leader in research designed to advance the treatment and care of ALS patients.

Keywords: [“ALS”, “Michigan”, “University”]
Source: https://www.umich-als.org/

Eleanor and Lou Gehrig ALS Center

The Eleanor and Lou Gehrig ALS Center leads an integrated ALS research program at Columbia University that spans basic, translational, and clinical efforts across multiple schools, departments, institutes, and centers throughout our institution. Through a growing understanding of motor neuron disease mechanisms, our efforts focus on the development of novel therapeutics for individuals and families with ALS. Patient-based research at the ALS Center includes brain imaging, genomic and observational studies, stem cell generation, and biofluid and tissue banking programs. These serve as the foundation of efforts to explore disease mechanisms, identify new therapeutic targets, and test novel candidate drugs and strategies which drive clinical research.

Keywords: [“ALS”, “efforts”, “research”]
Source: https://www.alscenter.cuimc.columbia.edu/research

Existing and Emerging Metabolomic Tools for ALS Research

Growing evidence suggests that aberrant energy metabolism could play an important role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite this, studies applying advanced technologies to investigate energy metabolism in ALS remain scarce. The rapidly growing field of metabolomics offers exciting new possibilities for ALS research. Here, we review existing and emerging metabolomic tools that could be used to further investigate the role of metabolism in ALS. A better understanding of the metabolic state of motor neurons and their surrounding cells could hopefully result in novel therapeutic strategies. Keywords: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis; energy metabolism; mass spectrometry; metabolic dysfunction; metabolomics; motor neuron.

Keywords: [“metabolism”, “metabolomic”, “ALS”]
Source: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31817338/

The LiveLikeLou Center for ALS Research

The goal of the LiveLikeLou Center for ALS Research is to develop new treatments and, ultimately, a cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and to improve the quality of life for people who are now living with the progressive, degenerative neurological condition. More information about the research being conducted by the LiveLikeLou Center’s scientific director, Christopher Donnelly, PhD, is available at www. Philanthropic giving plays a significant role in helping our scientists discover the basic science causes of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. The LiveLikeLou Center for ALS Research does not provide health care. For information on treatment available through the University of Pittsburgh and UPMC, we refer you to the MDA-ALS Center.

Keywords: [“Center”, “Research”, “ALS”]
Source: https://www.braininstitute.pitt.edu/centers-institutes-and-departments/live-lou-center-als-research

Existing and Emerging Metabolomic Tools for ALS Research

Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Growing evidence suggests that aberrant energy metabolism could play an important role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Despite this, studies applying advanced technologies to investigate energy metabolism in ALS remain scarce. The rapidly growing field of metabolomics offers exciting new possibilities for ALS research. Here, we review existing and emerging metabolomic tools that could be used to further investigate the role of metabolism in ALS. A better understanding of the metabolic state of motor neurons and their surrounding cells could hopefully result in novel therapeutic strategies.

Keywords: [“ALS”, “metabolism”, “metabolomic”]
Source: https://www.mdpi.com/2073-4425/10/12/1011

Support the ALS Clinic and Research Program

Thanks to the support of patients, families and friends like you, ALS research is moving swiftly. Here at the Massachusetts General Hospital ALS Multidisciplinary Clinic and Research Program our efforts are collaborative and wide-reaching, allowing us to nimbly shift resources to the treatments that show the most promise. Help raise valuable support for the ALS Multidisciplinary Clinic and Research Program and share their work. Learn more on our web site or download our brochure. Contact Us. For questions and more information about how you can support the ALS Clinic and Research Program, please contact Tricia Keck at 617.724.6432.

Keywords: [“research”, “ALS”, “Program”]
Source: https://giving.massgeneral.org/donate/als-research/

Gregory W. Fulton ALS & Neuromuscular Disease Center

The Gregory W. Fulton ALS and Neuromuscular Disease Center was founded to improve both care and research for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neuromuscular disorders. Our ALS clinic is a model for offering complete care within a single center while providing access to advanced clinical trials and promising basic science research. At the Fulton Center at Barrow Neurological Institute at Dignity Health St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, our physicians and research scientists work with and for you to deliver the vanguard of therapy for neuromuscular diseases while simultaneously developing the treatments of the future.

Keywords: [“Center”, “research”, “Neuromuscular”]
Source: https://www.barrowneuro.org/centers-programs/als-neuromuscular-disease/
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